AMSTERDAM CYCLING BRIDGE

AMSTERDAM CYCLING BRIDGE

PROJECT: (Non) Architecture Competition
YEAR: 2021
DURATION: 3 months

In Amsterdam, the lack of a cycling bridge over the river Ij has been a controversial issue for many years. Currently, the city is one of the few that does not have bridges for pedestrians or cyclists, and most people must use a ferry to cross from north to south.

The problem is complex, as the river has high traffic flow, and it would be difficult to integrate a bridge into the existing urban context. Additionally, there is pressure from citizens living and working in the north of the city, which is now difficult to access, to find a solution to the problem. Despite the urgency, the city has not yet found a viable solution. In response, Non Architecture invited designers from around the world to come up with creative solutions that would finally reconnect the north side of the city. More than 70 teams participated in the challenge, adding new energy to the debate around the need for a bridge over the Ij.

Community 2050

COMMUNITY 2050

SHENZHEN: INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM
AMSTERDAM: SOCIO-CULTURAL POWERHOUSE.

A collection of strategic visions from professionals and students

PROJECT: (Non) Architectural Contest
YEAR: 2021 – 2022
DURATION: 5 months
COMMISSIONER: Urban Planning and Design Institute Shenzhen (UPDIS)
PARTNER: ARQ; Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC)
MEDIA PARTNERS: KooZ/Arch, Act of Mapping

 

 

What will future communities look like and what should urban designers consider when thinking about 2050?

To explore answers to these questions, the Shenzhen Urban Planning and Design Institute (UPDIS) and the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) partnered with Non Architecture to organize the Community 2050 open contest. The contest featured two sites: Amsterdam Ijplein, the “sociocultural hub”, and Shenzhen High Tech Zone, the “innovation ecosystem”. Over 150 designers from 39 countries participated in the contest, developing proposals for one of the two sites, and contributing a total of more than 10,000 design hours. The submissions from professionals and young designers covered a wide range of scenarios and provided an overview of global trends and potential solutions for urban design. Through this initiative, UPDIS, IAAC, and NonA were able to gain insight into where the field of urban design and city-making may and should be headed in the future.

 

Saiwen Tang

Saiwen Tang

Director of The International Exchange and Joint Design Promotion Center, UPDIS

!The competition has stimulated us to think and explore the future of communities, the future of technology, and even human civilisation and development. It has helped us to find many excellent young design talents with high potentials."

 

RE-DRAW.03: Fallingwater

RE-DRAW.03: Fallingwater

REIMAGINE AN ARCHITECTURAL MASTERPIECE IN ONE DRAWING

A partnership with Fallingwater Fellowship Program.

PROJECT: (Non) Architectural Contest
YEAR: 2021
DURATION: 1 month
ORGANIZER: Non Architecture
PARTNER: Fallingwater© /Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
MEDIA PARTNERS: KooZA/rch, C_A_G_E, Arqpedia, ARCHIT Magazine AxoMadness

 

 

Fansworth House, also known as Fallingwater, is a world-renowned architectural masterpiece designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. It is currently managed by the Fallingwater Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, which runs cultural programs to promote the development of art and culture around Wright’s iconic building.

In partnership with Fallingwater, Non Architecture launched an open contest inviting architects from around the world to reinterpret Fallingwater through creative artworks. The winner, Juliette Blatter, with an artwork titled “Where is Frank”, was selected to join the Fallingwater Art Residency program. Through this contest, Fallingwater brought new energy into the fellowship program and reignited our appreciation for Wright’s masterpiece.

 

 

ASHLEY ANDRYKOVITCH

ASHLEY ANDRYKOVITCH

Curator of Education / Fallingwater

“An Escheresque dreamscape composition that keeps my eyes moving, in search of Frank!"

 

 

LEARNING

LEARNING

ALTERNATIVE DESIGNS FOR EDUCATIONAL SPACES

A publication on the spatial implications of the future of universities to contribute to the INTREPID EU Cost action.

 

PROJECT: Crowd-sourced Research
YEAR: 2018
DURATION: 12 months
COMMISSIONER: Intrepid Knowledge network; European Cooperation in Science and Technology COST
LEADING PARTNER: Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon, ISEG

 

 

The Intrepid COST action was a four-year program and network-building initiative focused on exploring the future of education, with a particular emphasis on universities. The Institute of Social Sciences at the University of Lisbon and ISEG, the leading parties in the project, invited Non Architecture to join the project and develop initiatives aimed at their design community. In this context, Non Architecture launched “Learning – Alternative Designs for Education,” a crowd-sourced research and design contest that collected participants from all around the world. The results of the contest were compiled into a book, which provided an overview of the potential implications and future developments of design for learning spaces. The book included over 55 design concepts, 3 articles, 5 student projects, 9 essays, 3 illustrations, and 2 photo essays. Findings were also shared throughout the project with all the experts involved, in live conferences, exhibitions and wor

kshops.

Through this Learning, Intrepid was able to add a more inclusive and visual dimension to their research, bringing fresh and diverse perspectives from creatives around the world.

 

 

OLIVIA BINA

OLIVIA BINA

Principal Researcher at ICS-ULisboa, coordinator of the INTREPID COST action

There are three reasons, at least, why the concept, methods and networks of NonA provide much needed quality support to the exploration of alternative futures: they can reach fast and wide across nations and cultures, providing precious diversity and plurality of voices, especially younger generations; they bring creative, out of the box thinking to an otherwise colonised space for imaginaries; and they increasingly bridge across disciplines to offer richer answers to the urgent questions of our times.